Album Review: Jay Rock's '90059' Leaves You Wanting More

As album releases become much harder to keep track of as of recent, Jay Rock's 90059 album release dilemma has finally been eliminated. There is something very raw about the album but somehow you finish it wanting more.

Right off the bat 90059 is high energy with "Necessary" and the track's West Coast style. One thing is undeniable and that's Jay Rock and the rest of the TDE crew's ability to hone in on the West Coast sound and deliver it in the best ways possible. Fans already know that "Easy Bake," the single featuring Kendrick Lamar and SZA is by far one of the standout tracks on the album.

It really has nothing to do with the features though both Lamar and SZA are excellent supplements to Jay Rock.

It's got a sinister vibe and in your face lyrics, The back and forth between Jay Rock and Lamar was pretty impressive but short, it would've been nice to have more of that.

Wanting more is really the theme of this review. Jay Rock is lyrically dangerous on every track. Especially on "Gumbo", a track that released a couple months ahead of the album's release.

It's good to see that the entire TDE family was able to have some part on Rock's album, especially the youngest member Isaiah Rashad who joined Rock on "Wanna Ride".

While it is Jay Rock's album you can't help but to compliment the team effort. "The Ways" featuring Sir features excellent production and you really have to compliment Jay Rock's versatility.

Jay Rock's Documentary

The haunting intro of "Telegram (Going Krazy)" featuring Lance Skiiiwalker leads you to think that you are in for something pretty sinister but it's balanced out pretty well with a Jazzy arrangement. Interestingly enough Jay Rock downplays social media and briefly talks about the trouble it could cause. It's a complete contrast to the old days and the use of telegrams and phone booths over mobile devices and social media.

"90059" shares it's name with the album title and sounds like a freestyle in a way. It's as if they told Jay Rock here's a beat, go kill it and he obliged.

Raw tracks like these are a big treat for heavy Hip-Hop fans who enjoyed the 90's Hip-Hop decade.

"Vice City" featuring Black Hippy (Lamar, Ab-Soul, ScHoolboy Q) was released hours before the album and really further heightened the hype for the album that was clearly there from the inception. The group tends to bring their A-game whenever they all grace a track which makes for a really pleasant listening experience for the listener.

The clever style of delivery they used is different and pretty fresh. To hear a new verse from Ab-Soul and ScHoolboy Q is even more of a treat because the two have been pretty quiet as of lately, especially Ab-Soul.

"Fly On The Wall" is a track that exposes Busta Rhymes for being one of the first people to discover Jay Rock. It's beautifully done especially Busta Rhymes' verse where he spoke about how proud he was of Jay Rock and how he was the biggest "Fly On The Wall." Before the album released "Money Trees Deuce" received a lot of admiration. It follows the first installment of the track that was featured on Kendrick Lamar's good Kid, m.A.A.d city.

Instead of a feature Jay Rock handles it on his own and makes something truly real and heartfelt. Of course, "The Message" closes things out with somewhat of a warning to other rappers out there.

He highlights a real lifestyle without fame and how some can't carry out the reality of their rhymes.

Now to the the overall final assessment of the 90059 album. It's solid and it should not disappoint in terms of it's subject matter and production. Jay Rock remained impressive throughout the album's entirety, that being said 11 tracks just doesn't seem good enough.

The album is so great that it makes you kind of fiend for at least a 15 track piece or more.

Other than that 90059 is a really awesome album and you will absolutely be able to appreciate everything it offers. Well done.